What is The Language of Newborn Babies? Know Surprising Facts

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Imagine you are holding your newborn baby in your arms for the first time. You look into their eyes and wonder what they are thinking and feeling. You hear them make some noises and wonder what they are trying to say. You wish you could understand their language and communicate with them.

Well, you are not alone. Many parents and caregivers are curious and eager to learn how newborns communicate. Communication is a vital skill that enables us to express ourselves, connect with others, and learn from the world. Communication is also a complex and fascinating process that involves many aspects, such as sounds, words, gestures, emotions, and thoughts.

In this article, we will delve into the language of newborns and uncover some surprising facts about how they communicate. We will explore how newborns develop their communication skills from birth to 12 months of age, and how they use different modes of communication, such as crying, cooing, babbling, and talking. We will also use scientific studies and real-life examples to provide a comprehensive understanding of newborn communication. By the end of this article, you will have a deeper and richer appreciation of your baby’s language and communication.

Newborn Communication Development: A Month-By-Month Guide

Newborn communication development is a rapid and remarkable process that occurs in the first year of life. During this time, newborns go through several stages of communication development, from making reflexive sounds to producing meaningful words. These stages are also known as milestones, which are indicators of a newborn’s ability to communicate. Here is a month-by-month guide of the main milestones of newborn communication development 

  • By 1 month: Your newborn can make different sounds, such as crying, grunting, or gurgling. They can also turn their head toward the source of a sound.
  • By 3 months: Your newborn can make vowel sounds, such as “ah”, “eh”, or “oh”. They can also coo and babble in response to your voice.
  • By 6 months: Your newborn can make consonant sounds, such as “b”, “m”, or “g”. They can also babble in long strings of sounds, such as “babababa” or “mamamama”.
  • By 9 months: Your newborn can understand simple words, such as their name, “mama”, or “dada”. They can also use gestures, such as pointing, waving, or nodding.
  • By 12 months: Your newborn can say one or two words, such as “hi”, “bye”, or “ball”. They can also imitate sounds and words that they hear.

These milestones are not fixed or exact. They are approximate and general, meaning that not every newborn will achieve them at the same time or in the same order. Some newborns may develop faster or slower than others.

Some newborns may skip some stages or repeat some stages. Some newborns may have different preferences or styles of communication. The important thing is to observe your newborn’s communication behavior and skills regularly, and to consult your pediatrician or a speech-language pathologist if you have any concerns.

Newborn Communication Modes: Crying, Cooing, Babbling, and Talking

Newborns use different modes of communication to express themselves and interact with others. These modes include crying, cooing, babbling, and talking. Each mode has its own characteristics, functions, and meanings. Here is an overview of the main modes of newborn communication:

  • Crying: Crying is the first and most basic mode of communication for newborns. Crying is a reflexive sound that newborns make when they are hungry, uncomfortable, or in pain. Crying is a way of signaling their needs and seeking your attention and care. Crying can also convey different emotions, such as anger, fear, or sadness. You can tell the difference between your newborn’s cries by listening to their pitch, intensity, and duration. For example, a hungry cry may be low-pitched, rhythmic, and persistent. A pain cry may be high-pitched, loud, and sudden. A bored cry may be whiny, soft, and intermittent.
  • Cooing: Cooing is the second mode of communication for newborns. Cooing is a vowel sound that newborns make when they are happy, relaxed, or interested. Cooing is a way of expressing their feelings and responding to your voice. Cooing can also indicate curiosity and exploration, as newborns coo to experiment with their vocal cords and mouth movements. You can encourage your newborn’s cooing by talking, singing, or smiling to them.
  • Babbling: Babbling is the third mode of communication for newborns. Babbling is a combination of vowel and consonant sounds that newborns make when they are excited, playful, or attentive. Babbling is a way of practicing their language and communication skills, as newborns babble to imitate the sounds and words that they hear. Babbling can also show awareness and intention, as newborns babble to attract your attention or to communicate their wants and needs. You can support your newborn’s babbling by repeating, expanding, or commenting on their sounds and words.
  • Talking: Talking is the fourth mode of communication for newborns. Talking is the use of meaningful words that newborns make when they are around 12 months old. Talking is a way of expressing their thoughts and ideas, as newborns talk to convey information, ask questions, or make requests. Talking can also show understanding and learning, as newborns talk to demonstrate their knowledge, memory, or problem-solving skills. You can foster your newborn’s talking by providing them with a rich and varied vocabulary, asking them open-ended questions, or teaching them new words.

Why Newborn Communication Matters

Understanding how newborns communicate can help you appreciate the amazing abilities and potential of your baby. It can also help you understand your baby’s behavior and needs better, and respond to them more effectively. Moreover, it can help you support and nurture your baby’s communication development with appropriate stimulation, interaction, and care. By doing so, you can foster a strong bond with your baby, and enhance their growth and well-being.

Conclusion

Your newborn baby’s communication is a complex and fascinating process that involves many aspects, such as sounds, words, gestures, emotions, and thoughts. In this article, we have explored how newborns develop their communication skills from birth to 12 months of age, and how they use different modes of communication, such as crying, cooing, babbling, and talking. We have also used scientific studies and real-life examples to provide a comprehensive understanding of newborn communication. By the end of this article, you have learned some surprising facts about how newborns communicate, and why it matters for new parents and caregivers. Remember that every baby is unique and communicates at their own pace. Enjoy this precious time with your little one!

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